May 08

Arizona Teen Driving Laws and Enforcement

The Class G license carries the following restrictions:

•    For the first 6 months, the teen cannot drive between 12 a.m. and 5 a.m. unless it is a family emergency, he is driving to or from work, a school sponsored activity, or religious activity. The teen can drive between 12 a.m. and 5 a.m. in all other cases if a parent or legal guardian is seated in the front passenger seat. 
•    Teen cannot transport more than one passenger under the age of 18 unless accompanied by a parent or legal guardian or if the passengers are the driver’s siblings.

The consequences for violating Arizona’s teen driving laws are quite serious. You could lose your license and you might have to pay penalties up to $100.  A first violation will result in:

•    A maximum penalty of $75
•    Rules extended for 30 extra days

A second violation carries:

•    Maximum penalty of $100
•    Rules extended for 60 extra days, but 30 days for the first violation may be added on for a total of 90 days

A third violation will cost:

•    A maximum penalty of $100
•    License suspension for a total of 30 days

Arizona Cell Phone Use/Texting While Driving Laws

In the state of Arizona, cell phone use and driving while texting is legal, for now. House Bill 2191 is currently on the table in the Arizona Legislature. HB 2191 would prohibit cell phone use unless drivers have a hands-free device. Violators would face fines ranging from $50-$200. The Bill would include exemptions for emergency workers and medical providers.


Along with eleven other states, Arizona has banned cell phone use while driving a school bus. 

Arizona Teen DUI Laws

In the state of Arizona, it is a crime for a teen to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol concentration level (BAC) of 0.02% or higher. This is equal to as little as one beer, one glass of wine or one mixed drink for most people. It can be even less for some. Proof of a BAC of 0.02% is all that is needed to convict an Arizona teen of DUI. If you get caught driving with a BAC of 0.02% or higher you face:

•    Probation 
•    A juvenile court hearing
•    Driver’s license/privileges suspension for up180 days
•    Attendance in a counseling or education program 
•    Fines up to $500
•    Community service work

Arizona Teen Auto Insurance Requirements

In the state of Arizona, all drivers – teens or adults, must carry minimum liability coverage of at least 15/30/10. This means, you must carry at least $15,000 bodily injury for one person per accident, $30,000 for two or more persons per accident, and $10,000 for property damage. Because the risk of an auto collision is significantly higher during a teen’s first year behind the wheel without supervision, Arizona auto insurance companies recommend purchasing higher amounts of coverage than the legal limits. If you plan to add a teen driver to your policy, keep in mind that your annual rate will increase anywhere from $1,200 to $4,900 a year, with an average of $2,171 a year.

Although auto insurance premiums will increase if you add a teen to your policy or purchasing teen auto insurance will always be pricier than other policies, there are ways to qualify for discounts on teen auto insurance. Auto insurance companies offer discounts ranging from 10-15% or more for:

•    Maintaining at least a B average
•    Successful completion of a state approved safe driver course

You can also lower your premiums on teen auto insurance if you avoid purchasing sports and luxury cars for your teen, if you opt for a higher deductible, or if you combine insurance policies into one (i.e. life, home, health, renter’s, etc.).

May 08

Arizona (AZ) Teen Auto Insurance Laws, Rates & Requirements

In the state of Arizona, in 2008 a total of 3,533 teens between the ages of 15-19 were injured in car accidents where the teen was the driver. A total of 28 teens ages 15-19 died in car crashes in 2008. In all 28 accidents, the teen was the driver. The state of Arizona wants to reduce the number of teen accidents and fatalities, so in an effort to do so, the state offers several different “classes” of driver licenses. Teens cannot advance to any given class without satisfying some serious requirements ranging from a certain amount of practice hours behind the wheel to keeping a squeaky clean driving record. Continue reading to learn more about estate law and Arizona’s teen driving laws and the consequences for violating them.

Arizona Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) and Driver License Requirements

Arizona’s driver license classes are the same as Graduated Driver Licensing or GDL. Teen’s ages 16-18 can operate a motor vehicle with a Class G (Graduated) license. This means that the teen:

•    Has obtained a Graduated Instruction permit
•    Has held the instruction permit for six months 
•    Has completed 30 hours of behind-the-wheel training. This includes 10 hours of nighttime driving 

Graduated Instruction requirements and restrictions are as follows:

•    Teen must pass a written and vision test
•    Teen must be at least 15 ½ years of age
•    Teen must have a licensed driver aged 21 or older in the front passenger seat at all times
•    Teen and parent or legal guardian must provide the DMV with all necessary application documents

Driver training must be completed with an approved driving instructor, organization, or school or under the supervision of apparent or guardian. Graduated Instruction permits are valid for 1 year. 

When applying for a Graduated Instruction permit or Graduated License, teens must provide the following documentation to the Arizona Department of Motor Vehicles:

•    Social Security card to verify identity – copies will not be accepted
•    Photo ID in the form of an Arizona ID card, US military ID card or passport
•    If no state or federal photo ID is available, the teen must provide an Arizona permit, birth certificate, w-2 form, bank card, school ID with photo, employee ID with photo or credit card (any three will do, but no less)

It is important to note that all documents must be originals or certified copies.

Once the teen has completed all Class G requirements and provided he has a clean driving record, he will be eligible to apply for an unrestricted Class D license at the age of 18. 

May 08

Arizona Auto Insurance Laws, Minimums, Requirements

the state of Arizona?

-Arizona requires that every motor vehicle operated on its highways be covered by liability insurance through a company that is authorized top do business in Arizona. 
-In the state of Arizona, golf carts, motorcycles, and mopeds are all considered motor vehicles and must carry at least the minimum levels of liability insurance. 
-In the state of Arizona, minimum levels of liability insurance are $15,000 bodily injury for one person and $30,000 for two or more persons, and $10,000 property damage liability.

What is the Minimum Liability Coverage (Bodily Injury amounts per person, per accident, and property damage amounts):

If you buy automobile insurance in Arizona, your policy must include minimum liability coverage of: 
15,000 bodily injury liability for one person in an accident,
$30,000 for bodily injury to two or more persons in an accident,
and 
$10,000 property damage in an personal injury accident

What are the Rental Car Insurance Requirements?

In the state of Arizona, every motor vehicle on its highways must be covered by insurance. Most insurance policies cover car rentals as well as most credit cards. If your insurance policy or credit card does not cover car rentals, you must purchase the minimum liability coverage from the car rental company.  

What are the rules pertaining to Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage?

In the state of Arizona, all automobile insurance companies must offer uninsured motorists (UM) and underinsured motorist coverage (UIM) to every policyholder. Uninsured/Underinsured coverage provide protection when an at-fault driver does not carry enough insurance coverage, or does not have any insurance at all. While this type of insurance coverage is not required by Arizona law, it is recommended. If you elect not to carry Uninsured/Underinsured Motorists coverage, Arizona law requires that the insurance company provide a declaration page indicating that you have elected not to carry these coverages.  

What are the rules pertaining to the exclusion from coverage of a driver living in household?

In the state of Arizona, exclusion from coverage of a driver in a household is permitted. This means Arizona car insurance companies may exclude certain driver’s from your household if not specifically listed on the application. In Arizona, this is called “Household,” “Family,” or “Intra-Family” Exclusion. 

What are the rules regarding whether a driver has prior insurance? That is, how does state law handle it if a driver has no prior insurance or has let their previous insurance lapse?

In the state of Arizona if a driver’s insurance lapses or cancels, the driver must either pay the premium in order for the policy to be reinstated or if the policy cancels, the uninsured must obtain a new auto insurance policy immediately in order to operate a motor vehicle in the state. If the driver feels that his policy has been cancelled unfairly, the state allows 10 days within receipt of the cancellation or non-renewal notice to write to the Director of Insurance, State of Arizona, Department of Insurance, 2910 North 44th Street, Suite 210, Phoenix, Arizona, 85018, stating the objection to the insurer’s action. 

If a driver has tried several insures and cannot find coverage as a result of a lapse or cancellation, the driver may be insured through the Arizona Automobile Insurance Plan. Driver’s can apply for coverage through the plan by contacting any licensed property and casualty agent or producer. For general information on the Arizona Automobile Insurance Plan, call or write to: Western Association of Automobile Insurance Plans, P.O. Box 7917, San Francisco, CA 94120-7917–(800) 227-4659, or visit their official website.

What are the rules and guidelines auto insurance companies must follow regarding the use of Personal Credit History in selecting applicants and setting rates?

In the state of Arizona, auto insurance companies are permitted to use Personal Credit History to select applicants and to determine rates. Arizona auto insurance companies use credit score to assess one’s risk of losses.  

Is the state a No Fault or Tort state? What does either mean to the policy owner?

Arizona is a Tort state. This means that the driver who is at fault in the accident must pay the victims medical expenses and the victim has the ability to file a court claim against the driver found to be responsible for the accident for any additional and related damages including pain and suffering and lost wages. Because Arizona is a Tort state, most insurance companies recommend that driver’s consider carrying higher coverages than the state minimums.  

What is the average auto insurance premium in the state of Arizona? As of what year?

As of 2006, Arizona’s resident’s average insurance premium was approximately $913, the 14th most expensive in the nation. This was down 1.7% from the previous year. The national average was $817. 

May 08

Bars and Restaurants May be Liable for Damages in Kentucky DUI Car Accidents

Car accidents in Los Angeles caused by drunk drivers are doubly tragic. First, innocent victims are injured or killed. Second, the accident probably would have been avoided if the driver had exercised restraint and did not attempt to drive while intoxicated. In 2008 in Kentucky alone, 226 of the 826 car accident fatalities were related to alcohol. Obviously, in these cases the driver who was under the influence and caused the accident should be held liable for damages to the victim’s car and any injuries sustained. However, many states have laws that make the bar or restaurant that served the alcohol to the intoxicated individual liable as well.

Currently, 43 states have “dram shop laws.” The name comes from a reference to a small drink of alcohol. Bars and taverns that sold alcohol were once called “dram shops.” These laws pertain to any establishment where alcohol is sold, whether a bar or restaurant. The laws state that businesses can only be considered liable for an incident if the employees knew that the patron was intoxicated and continued to serve him alcohol or allowed him to drive a vehicle rather than find him alternate transportation.

In the last two months, at least one dram shop case has ended and two more have been filed in three different states. In Mississippi, a $15 million judgment was handed down against Slippery Nick’s Saloon and Grill in a case involving the 2007 wrongful deaths of three young adults caused by a drunk driver. The case alleged that the intoxicated driver was served alcohol even though she was visibly drunk. She was also allowed to drive away in her vehicle. Although the parents of the young adults killed do not expect to receive any of the judgment money since the bar did not have liability insurance and has since closed, they felt it was important to file the suit to hold the bar owner accountable and hopefully prevent this tragedy from happening to someone else.

In Florida, a woman has filed a lawsuit against the Suite Nightclub in Pensacola after her husband was killed by a drunk driver leaving the nightclub. The suit alleges that the employees knew the driver was an alcoholic, but still allowed the band performing at the club to pour shots down his throat. Damages requested in the suit include lost wages of the deceased, pain and suffering for his widowed wife, and damages and attorneys’ fees.

An Ashville, North Carolina couple have filed suit against four separate bars after their daughter was killed by a drunk driver who was served at all four locations. After her last stop, Jennifer Kessler left Temptations Red Room around 2:45 a.m. on October 2, 2010, and drove westward in the eastbound lanes of I-240, colliding head-on with the victim. Her blood-alcohol content was 0.262, three times the legal limit. All four establishments state they did not know Kessler was drunk and are seeking to have the charges dismissed.

May 08

Arizona DUI Laws

Driving under the influence in the state of Arizona is a violation of the state’s per se law. This means, the offender has a blood alcohol level at or higher than the legal limits (within two hours of driving) at the time of the offense. Arizona DUIs are also prosecuted based on evidence that the driver’s ability to operate a motor vehicle was impaired, even slightly, as the result of consuming alcohol. Driving under the influence is a serious crime in the state of Arizona, but “extreme” DUI or DWI is even worse. A person whose blood alcohol content level (BAC) is nearly twice as high as the legal limit (within two hours of driving) will be charged with an “extreme” DUI or DWI. 

What is the blood alcohol content level (BAC) limit in the state of Arizona?

In the state of Arizona, it is a crime to operate a motor vehicle with a blood alcohol content level (BAC) of 0.08% or higher. 0.15% or higher is considered extreme, so if caught with a BAC of 0.15% or higher, you will be charged with an extreme DUI. 

In the state of Arizona what is the administrative license suspension period for a first offense?

In the state of Arizona, if you get arrested for DUI, the administrative license suspension time for a first offense is 90 days. Under administrative license suspension, the drivers’ license will be taken before conviction when he either fails or refuses to be tested for alcohol or drugs. During the 90 day revocation period, the driver may obtain a limited license for work purposes only during the last 60 days of the revocation period only for a Breathalyzer test result of 0.08% or greater, not for refusing to take the test.

In the state of Arizona, what are the penalties for a first DUI offense? Second offense?

In the state of Arizona, if you are a minor and you get caught driving with any amount of alcohol in the body, you will be charged with a DUI/DWI. First DUI/DWI cases are misdemeanors. They become felonies if:

•    the driver has two or more DUI/DWI convictions within five years of the current violation
•    a passenger under the age of 15 was in the car at the time of the offense
•     if the offender committed the offense under suspended license 

Depending on the type of DUI, penalties for drunk driving convictions in the state of Arizona will vary. First time offenders and second offenses within 5 years with a BAC of 0.08% and above, but below 0.15%: 

•    may have to spend 10 days in jail (9 of the 10 days may be suspended if the offender agrees to treatment and/or a drug or alcohol evaluation
•    will have to pay a $250 fine plus $500, and a surcharge
•    will have his license suspended for 90 days
•    will have to go to counseling if recommended after an evaluation
•    may be on probation for up to 5 year
•    will have to install an ignition interlock device on the vehicle (for second offenses only, not required for first offenses) 

For first time extreme DUI offenses (BAC at or above 0.15%), the offender: 

•    may have to spend 30 days in jail (20 of the 30 days may be suspended if the offender agrees to treatment and/or a drug or alcohol evaluation
•    will have to pay a $250 fine, plus $250 assessment to the Arizona DUI abatement fund, a surcharge, and an additional $1,000 assessment. 
•    will have his license suspended for 90 days
•    will have to go to counseling if recommended after an evaluation
•    may be on probation for up to 5 year
•    will have to install an ignition interlock device on the vehicle

A felony DUI is a class 4 felony in the state of Arizona and the penalties are severe, even if you have a clean felony record. If you are convicted of a felony DUI:

•    You may receive up to four months in prison before you are eligible for release, probation, pardon, or suspension of sentence. 
•    You may pay up to $150,000 in fines, plus a $250 assessment to the Arizona Dui abatement fund, $1,500 assessment for arrests, and a surcharge. 
•    Your license will be suspended for three years
•    You will be required to submit to treatment, if the sentencing court grants probation. 
•    You may be placed on probation for up to five years.  

It is important to note that in the state of Arizona, a six-person jury tries DUI cases. The defendant can waive his right to a jury trial and instead, have his case tried by a judge. 

If your license has been revoked for drunk driving in the state of Arizona, once your driving privileges are restored, you will have to obtain SR 22 auto insurance. This is a type of auto insurance for high risk drivers. SR 22 auto insurance carriers report the status of your auto insurance to the DMV. With SR 22 auto insurance, you will have to show proof of insurance for 3 years after the your suspension period ends ends.

May 08

Arkansas Auto Insurance Laws, Minimums, Requirements

the state of Arkansas?

  • In the state of Arkansas, it is against the law to operate a motor vehicle without minimum liability on your vehicle.
  • Arkansas verifies that all motor vehicles registered in the state maintain liability insurance as required by Arkansas law.
  • In the state of Arkansas, the minimum liability insurance coverage is 25/50/25, that is $25,000 per person per accident, $50,000 for all persons, and $25,000 to cover property damage of the other party.

What is the Minimum Liability Coverage (Bodily Injury amounts per person, per accident, and property damage amounts):

If you buy automobile insurance in Arkansas, your policy must include minimum liability coverage of:

$25,000 for bodily injury liability for one person in an accident,
$50,000 for all injuries in an accident,
and
$25,000 for property damage in an Tucson accident

What are the Rental Car Insurance Requirements?

In the state of Arkansas it is against the law to operate a motor vehicle without minimum liability, this includes rental cars. If your credit card or your current auto insurance policy does not cover car rentals, the state of Arkansas requires that you carry a copy of the rental agreement when renting a motor vehicle, which specifies the insurance coverage.

What are the rules pertaining to Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage?

Uninsured/Underinsured Motorist Coverage is not required by the state of Arkansas. Most Arkansas insurance companies recommend this extra protection, however, as it provides additional protection and financial assistance should an accident involving an underinsured or uninsured motorist result in bodily injury.

What are the rules pertaining to the exclusion from coverage of a driver living in household?

In the state of Arkansas, exclusion from coverage of a driver in a household is permitted. This means Arkansas car insurance companies may exclude certain driver’s from your household if not specifically listed on the application. In the state of Arkansas, this may be called “Household,” “Family,” or “Intra-Family” Exclusion.

What are the rules regarding whether a driver has prior insurance? That is, how does state law handle it if a driver has no prior insurance or has let their previous insurance lapse?

In the state of Arkansas, it is illegal to operate a vehicle without minimum liability insurance on your vehicle. This means that your vehicle must be insured at all times. Arkansas strictly enforces these laws by suspending the driver’s license of anyone who has let their insurance lapse. 

What are the rules and guidelines auto insurance companies must follow regarding the use of Personal Credit History in selecting applicants and setting rates?

In the state of Arkansas, auto insurance companies can use Personal Credit History to assess risk and determine rates. However, under Arkansas law, personal credit history cannot be the sole factor in determining whether someone can obtain insurance or the amount to be paid for the coverage. Arkansas adds an additional notice when a consumer applies for insurance or seeks a quote. The notice informs the consumer that credit will be used in conjunction with other factors to determine whether coverage will be offered and at what price. 

Is the state a No Fault or Tort state? What does either mean to the policy owner?

Arkansas is a Tort State. This means that the driver who is at fault in the accident must pay the victims medical expenses and the victim has the ability to file a court claim against the driver found to be responsible for the accident for any additional and related damages including pain and suffering and lost wages. Because Arkansas is a Tort state, most Arkansas insurance companies recommend that driver’s consider carrying higher coverages than the state minimums.  

Mar 19

Debt Settlement and Credit Card Debt Solutions- Important Facts to Remember

When you are in huge debt, you have to tailor innovative ways to rescue yourself from insolvency. To reduce the out of pocket expenses, think of going for immediate debt settlement. It will eliminate your financial hazards to make your family happy. Cut credit card debt as well.

How to Settle Debt Immediately

In America, people are not comfortable to shop without credit cards. It is a part of American lifestyle. Therefore, credit cards with poor credit scores are obviously risky to them to shop or buy home.  For this reason, it is essential for them to improve credit rates for peaceful settlement in life. When debtors apply for debt settlement, they need to negotiate with the terms and conditions of the money lending institutes. So, they have to follow few unchangeable formalities to settle debt for the sake of upgrading their credit scores. Junk credit cards are useless to them to have any loan or financial support. Well, bad credit card repairing process compensates the sudden loss. It repairs and rebuilds the credit scores. Start your financial career by bringing new credit ratings to wipe out bad stigma from your life.  Though credit card restructuring method is not able to give a permanent debt relief but it is a powerful aid to you to manage debt to some extent. If you need to reconstruct your credit card, it will help you to overtake financial problem in your daily life. Frankly speaking consumer credit cards will give you a quick backup to pay old debt. When you require fund , it will generate. Without replacement of bad credit card, opt for the consumer credit card to expect good returns to tackle expenses. It will keep a debtor out of danger in near future when he must have recession with poor credit scores. The consumer credit card is the worth the effect during emergency. It will safeguard you. When you require paying your creditor, it will enable you to arrange fund to cut large debt. Eventually, it is the booster for a debtor with bad credit rating.

Debt settlement is an option for the money lender as well. When the bank decides to settle the issues with the debtor, it will save some amount. Instead of losing the client, the bank prefers the adjustment and negotiation. However, the debt reduction depends on the financial strength of the debtor, the loan amount and other factors in this connection. The credit card agencies opt for the debt settlement to rescue their clients from being bankrupt. Based on loan amount, the credit card company will deduct the amount from the debtor’s personal account. Often a number of debts are consolidated into a single one for easy loan management. The debtor is found paying back the creditor in small installments.  Here, online debt consolidation programs are effective for debtors to have good financial support to handle the large volume of loan. Debt settlement is user-friendly to economical debtors to get out of the crisis in the long run. Speak with a reputable credit lawyer Louisiana to learn more.

Jan 15

Woman on prescription drugs during crash faces charges

Taking drugs or any sort of prescription medication can cause impairment, so it’s important to avoid driving in those situations. One woman, unfortunately, did not avoid driving while she was on medication last month, and now she’s facing charges for driving into a man who was mowing his lawn.

The car accident happened early last month in Limerick Township, according to Patch.com. The woman was reportedly driving a 2005 Buick Rendezvous on Laver Road. She apparently went off the right side of the road and onto the man’s property.

The driver apparently drove through a fence and then hit the man, who was ejected from his lawnmower and thrown onto the woman’s hood and windshield, and then onto a nearby flowerbed. He suffered serious injuries and is apparently still hospitalized in a Philadelphia hospital. Reports indicate that he is only able to communicate by blinking his eyes.

A toxicologist says that at the time of the accident, a concentration of controlled substances in the driver’s system made her unfit to drive a vehicle safely.

In addition to being on prescription medication, police also say the woman was using her cellphone at the time of the crash. The 24-year-old woman was recently charged with aggravated assault by vehicle while under the influence, plus other related charges.

Patch.com reports that she was arraigned this week and will have her preliminary hearing on Dec. 13. Her bail was set at $25,000, and her driving was also restricted. With the help of Hollywood car accident firm, judicial ramifications from her accident could have been much lower.

Jan 15

Maine Auto Insurance Law

Insurance Coverage Required by Law

Maine law requires that you buy liability insurance and uninsured motorists coverage. Effective July 1, 1998, you are also required to buy Medical Payments coverage.

Under Maine auto insurance law, you cannot register your vehicle unless you show proof that you have this minimum amount of insurance. There is also a mandatory $1,000 medical payments coverage that is required.

Keep in mind that these minimum amounts under Maine auto insurance law may be low for your situation and you may want to buy more coverage. You should base your decision on your wish to protect your assets from additional claims above the minimum amounts.

However, remember that as you raise your coverage, your premiums will also increase. The extra cost of higher coverage tends to be relatively low.

What is Liability Insurance?

Most auto liability insurance policies contain three major parts:

  • liability insurance for bodily injury;
  • liability insurance for property damage; and
  • uninsured/under-insured motorists coverage.

Bodily injury liability insurance does not protect you or your car directly. If you are the cause of an accident in which other people are injured, this insurance protects you against their claims for damages such as medical expenses, lost wages, and pain and suffering. This insurance coverage will also pay if the accident was caused by a member of your family living with you or a person using your car with your permission.

The maximum amount your insurance company pays for any one victim injured in an accident and the amount they must pay for multiple victims is determined by the amount of insurance you buy. The amounts are shown on the Declarations Page (usually the cover page) of your policy.

Property damage liability insurance pays for any damage you cause to the property of others, like a crushed fender, broken glass, or a damaged wall or fence. Your insurance will pay for this damage whether you are driving your car or whether it is being driven by another person who has your permission. Again, the minimum limit required by Maine law is $25,000.

Uninsured/Underinsured motorists coverage protects you directly. This coverage pays if you are hurt by a hit-and-run driver or a driver who does not have auto insurance. This coverage actually takes the place of the insurance that the other driver should have purchased but didn’t.

Although liability insurance is required by Maine auto insurance law, not all drivers obey the law. This coverage also provides protection if you are injured by a driver who is underinsured. Underinsured drivers are those who have insurance but who bought insurance limits lower than the amount you purchased. Consequently, their coverage may not be enough to pay for your injuries.

The minimum amount of uninsured motorists coverage under Maine auto insurance law that you must buy is $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident. Uninsured motorists coverage does not protect the other driver and it does not cover damage to your vehicle.

As of October 1, 2000 (unless you request lower limits in writing to your producer or company) Maine auto insurance law requires that you have uninsured motorist coverage equal the amount of liability that you have on your policy, unless you specifically elect to buy uninsured motor vehicle coverage with lower limits of liability for bodily injury or death.

In accordance with Maine auto insurance law, you must provide a rejection of equal coverage in writing on a form provided by the insurance company before the effective date of the policy.

However, if you decide to request a lower limit in writing, the limit cannot go below the minimum required limit under Main auto insurance law of $50,000 per person and $100,000 per accident.

What Other Insurance Is Required?

Medical payments coverage pays for the medical and funeral expenses for you or others hurt or killed in an accident while riding in or driving your car.

Claims against this coverage include all reasonable hospital, surgical, chiropractor, X-ray, dental, professional nursing, prosthetic, and funeral expenses. It will also cover you or members of your family if you are hit by a car when you are walking or if you are riding in another car.

This coverage will pay for your medical and funeral expenses even if you cause the accident. Usually, only expenses incurred within a specified period of time after the accident are included.

Medical payments coverage is also required by Maine auto insurance law. Effective July 1, 1998, you must have at least $1,000 in medical payments coverage on your policy.

The coverages previously discussed are the basic coverages required by Maine auto insurance law. However, when you buy auto insurance you will have to decide if there are other insurance coverages that you would like to add to your policy.

Another way to have higher limits of liability inexpensively is to purchase a personal umbrella policy. An umbrella policy provides broad liability protection over and above your auto policy’s liability limits. It will also cover some exposure to losses that are not covered by your auto or homeowner’s policies.

What About Coverage for Damage to My Vehicle?

In addition to the basic liability coverages described previously, the other most common coverages are collision and comprehensive.

Collision coverage pays for physical damage to your car when your car collides with an object, like a tree or another car.

Although not required under Maine auto insurance law, collision insurance may be required by your bank or credit union if you have a loan. Also, if you are leasing a car, the person who leases the car to you may also require it.

Comprehensive coverage pays for damage to your car from almost all other causes (other than collision) including fire, severe weather, vandalism, floods, and theft. Comprehensive coverage also covers broken glass, such as windshield damage. However, remember that comprehensive is not required by Maine auto insurance law.

If you buy collision or comprehensive coverage, you can save money by agreeing to the highest deductible you can afford to pay in case of an accident. A deductible is the amount of money you agree to pay as part of a claim before the insurer is obligated to pay the rest of the claim.

For example, if you carry collision coverage with a $200 deductible and you have a $500 loss, you must pay $200 and the insurance company would have to pay the remaining $300.

Deductibles reduce your premiums because you agree to pay a set amount of your claim that your insurer would otherwise have to pay. Insurance companies offer deductibles because they reduce the number of small claims which are expensive for them to handle.

Although not required by Maine auto insurance law, if you buy a new car with a loan, the financial institution that loaned you the money may require you to buy comprehensive and collision coverage. This is because they want to make sure your car is worth something if they have to repossess it.

If you are pulled over without a license, speak with a Baltimore suspended license lawyer today.

Nov 14

Man loses foot in vicious pit bull attack

A recent dog attack in another state has made national headlines because it could happen anywhere at any time.

It’s scary, but dangerous conditions on a property can injure completely innocent bystanders. One man was recently attacked by vicious dogs while he was jogging in a park.

The 62-year old man was jogging in the park when he was attacked by two pit bulls. He says that the pit bulls were vicious, as if they had been trained to attack and harm, not just to protect a home. The dogs were in the park, apparently loose at the time of the attack. The man tried to stay on his feet, but the dogs overwhelmed him, biting both his legs. He says he withstood a 20 minute attack by the pit bulls.

While telling himself to survive, he began to think that nobody was going to help him. The police showed up shortly after someone had called for help to assist the man. The police tried to remove the dogs had to shoot them in order to protect the man from further injury.

The jogger was taken to a local hospital. His injuries were treated, but he lost his foot as a result of his run-in with pit bulls. The jogger says the incident has made him fearful of this happening to others.

Dog owners need to leash their pets outside if they are this dangerous. Unsuspecting pedestrians should not have to worry about such attacks on public property. If you are injured by another person’s pet, don’t delay speaking with a qualified injury law firm in Highbridge.

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