«

»

May 04

Brain Damage and Hand Eye Coordination

You can see that the frontal lobe of the brain plays a very important role in determining the quality of our lives. Now, what happens when the frontal lobe of the brain is injured? The changes that occur when there is damage to the frontal lobe include problems with sequencing, severation (where there is difficulty making decisions), decreased attention, personality alterations, problem solving difficulties, a decrease in the ability to communicate verbally, a lack of spontaneity, rigidity or inflexible thinking.

Next we come to the temporal lobe. The temporal lobe has several very important functions. It controls short-term memory, receptive language, language comprehension, musical awareness, selective attention, our object categorization (the ability to locate objects), and, importantly, face recognition. The temporal lobe also controls behavior, in particular aggressive behavior and our ability to keep aggression in check. If you think about your own life, the things that you do and the way that you interact with people, you can see how the temporal lobe serves all of us a very important purpose. So what happens when our temporal lobe is damaged?

When the temporal lobe is injured, it creates problems understanding the spoken word. There are also problems with selective attention, and even sexuality changes. A person with a temporal lobe injury may be found to persistently talk, and often with a temporal lobe injury we see an increase in aggressive behavior. There may also be problems finding, identifying and categorizing objects and faces.

So now let’s talk a little bit about the parietal lobe with some injury attorneys. This area of the brain takes us into a higher level of functioning. As we use our brains for thought processing, different aspects of knowing where our bodies are in space and things of that nature, the parietal lobe steps in to provide the functionality to successfully execute those actions. In the parietal lobe, we have the control of what’s called “spatial orientation,” or being able to identify where our bodies are in space. We have control of the awareness of our bodies, and our various body parts (where our arms and legs are, and what they are doing). We have our tactile perception (what we feel in our fingertips). Our academic skills, how we achieve in school and in the workplace. Object naming – how we file and apply names to faces and objects. Visual attention – the way that we are able to focus visually. The distinction between right and left. And, very importantly, our hand-eye coordination.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>